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Magnesium can lower the risk of heart disease

Magnesium can lower the risk of heart disease


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Higher magnesium intake could reduce the risk of coronary artery disease

A recent study showed that higher magnesium intake was associated with a statistically significant risk reduction in fatal coronary artery disease and a reduction in the risk of sudden cardiac death.

Magnesium is one of the most important nutrients for humans. Those who consume too little of the trace element permanently endanger their health. Magnesium deficiency can lead to massive damage to the heart, among other things. Conversely, an increased intake of the mineral may also protect the heart.

Reverse context

According to a release from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., a new study found a possible reverse relationship between dietary magnesium and fatal coronary artery disease in postmenopausal women.

The study is based on data from the US’s Women’s Health Initiative, launched in 1993 by the National Institutes of Health.

The study results were published in the health journal "Journal of Women’s Health", which was checked by experts.

Lower risk of coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac death

Dr. Charles Eaton from Alpert Medical School at Brown University in Providence (Rhode Island, USA) and a large team of researchers from various institutions examined the magnesium intake of more than 153,000 postmenopausal women at the start of the study.

Then they looked at the development of fatal coronary artery disease (CHD) and sudden cardiac death in the following 10.5 years of follow-up care.

The evaluated data showed that higher magnesium intake was associated with a statistically significant risk reduction in fatal CHD and a reduction in the risk of sudden cardiac death.

Dr. Susan G. Kornstein, editor-in-chief of the Journal of Women's Health and Executive Director of the Institute for Women's Health at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine in Richmond, Virginia, said:

"If the results of this study are confirmed, future research should review whether women at high risk would benefit from magnesium supplements to reduce the risk of fatal coronary artery disease."

Do not take magnesium on suspicion

But simply taking magnesium on suspicion is not advisable. Because this can be counterproductive, explains the German Heart Foundation on its website.

According to the foundation, magnesium preparations should only be used if a blood sample actually gives rise to it.

A magnesium deficiency can lead to cardiac arrhythmia, among other things. An extreme magnesium deficiency is capable of causing life-threatening ventricular fibrillation and thus sudden cardiac death.

People with heart disease should have their magnesium and potassium levels checked regularly if they suffer from additional kidney disease, heart failure or irregular heartbeat, or are taking medications that affect the electrolyte balance. (ad)

Author and source information

This text corresponds to the specifications of the medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical doctors.

Swell:

  • Mary Ann Liebert, Inc .: Could Higher Magnesium Intake Reduce Fatal Coronary Heart Disease Risk in Women ?, (accessed: December 26, 2019), Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  • Journal of Women’s Health: Association of Dietary Magnesium Intake with Fatal Coronary Heart Disease and Sudden Cardiac Death, (accessed: December 26, 2019), Journal of Women’s Health
  • German Heart Foundation: This is why potassium and magnesium are so important for the heart, (accessed: December 26, 2019), German Heart Foundation



Video: Coronary Artery Disease: Heart Healthy Eating (October 2022).